Questionnaire  




Executors

An adult individual or financial institution that is appointed to administer your estate upon your death. The executor will file the application for probate with the court, prepare an inventory of the estate assets, pay all debts and taxes and distribute the property to the beneficiaries of your estate. Spouses are presumed to be the first choice. Please provide two alternates to serve separately, or if they are to serve together, please so indicate.


General Durable Power of Attorney

This Power of Attorney is designed to allow a person or persons you designate to manage your financial affairs should you become mentally unable to do so. These powers allow the agent to act on your behalf, but they are limited.to actions you would normally perform like pay bills or make small gifts. Spouses are presumed to be the first choice. Please provide two alternates to serve separately, or if they are to serve together, please so indicate.


Medical Power of Attorney

This Power of Attorney is designed to allow a person or persons you designate to manage your financial affairs should you become mentally unable to do so. These powers allow the agent to act on your behalf, but they are limited.to actions you would normally perform like pay bills or make small gifts. Spouses are presumed to be the first choice. Please provide two alternates to serve separately, or if they are to serve together, please so indicate.


Advance Directive or Living Will

The Advance Directive, also known as a Living Will, allows you to make decisions about whether or not you would like to receive life-sustaining treatment in two specific scenarios.


Last Will and Testament

The two most common wills are a traditional Will and a Pour-Over Will.

The Traditional Will distributes your property at your death and requires you to designate an executor who will be responsible for the distribution of your assets. The executor you name is also responsible for hiring an attorney to represent them during the probate court process.


The Pour-Over Will is used when you establish a trust as part of your estate plan and transfers any assets not already in your trust into it upon your death. If all of your property is either held in the Revocable Trust or another form of non-probate titling, then the Pour-Over Will should not need to be probated because your estate will have no remaining property.


Revocable Living Trust

A Revocable Living Trust serves a number of purposes. The first, and most important purpose is to protect and prevent your assets from probate proceedings. By placing your assets into a Trust, it allows your beneficiaries to quickly distribute their inheritance without any interference from the Court. Second, if you have a less than responsible beneficiary, a trust will allow you to control how much and how often they receive their inheritance. Finally, the individual named as your successor Trustee will be able to manage your financial and other business affairs should either of you become incapacitated. This may avoid court guardianship proceedings, saving you and your family considerable time and money.

Any additional information you believe we need to know in order to put together a complete Estate plan for you and your family?